Encyclopedia of the Black Arts Movement [Kietas viršelis]

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  • Formatas: Hardback, 410 pages, aukštis x plotis x storis: 262x186x31 mm, weight: 1052 g, 30 Halftones, black and white
  • Išleidimo metai: 15-May-2019
  • Leidėjas: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
  • ISBN-10: 1538101459
  • ISBN-13: 9781538101452
Kitos knygos pagal šią temą:
  • Formatas: Hardback, 410 pages, aukštis x plotis x storis: 262x186x31 mm, weight: 1052 g, 30 Halftones, black and white
  • Išleidimo metai: 15-May-2019
  • Leidėjas: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
  • ISBN-10: 1538101459
  • ISBN-13: 9781538101452
Kitos knygos pagal šią temą:
The Black Arts Movement (BAM) encompassed a group of artists, musicians, novelists, and playwrights whose work combined innovative approaches to literature, film, music, visual arts, and theatre. With a heightened consciousness of black agency and autonomy-along with the radical politics of the civil rights movement, the Black Muslims, and the Black Panthers-these figures represented a collective effort to defy the status quo of American life and culture. Between the late 1950s and the end of the 1970s, the movement produced some of America's most original and controversial artists and intellectuals. In Encyclopedia of the Blacks Arts Movement, Verner D. Mitchell and Cynthia Davis have collected essays on the key figures of the movement, including Maya Angelou, James Baldwin, Amiri Baraka, Nikki Giovanni, Larry Neal, Sun Ra, Sonia Sanchez, Ntozake Shange, and Archie Shepp. Additional entries focus on Black Theatre magazine, the Negro Ensemble Company, lesser known individuals-including Kathleen Collins, Tom Dent, Bill Gunn, June Jordan, and Barbara Ann Teer-and groups, such as AfriCOBRA and the New York Umbra Poetry Workshop. The Black Arts Movement represented the most prolific expression of African American literature since the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s. Featuring essays by contemporary scholars and rare photographs of BAM artists, Encyclopedia of the Blacks Arts Movement is an essential reference for students and scholars of twentieth-century American literature and African American cultural studies.
Acknowledgements Preface Introduction by LaToya R. Jefferson-James Timeline Entries AfriCOBRA Allen, Samuel Angelou, Maya Baldwin, James "Ballad of Birmingham" Bambara, Toni Cade Baraka, Amiri Black Aesthetic, The Black Arts Movement in Algeria, The "Black Dada Nihilismus" Black Fire: An Anthology of Afro-American Writing Black Theatre Issue of The Drama Review Black Theatre Magazine Black Women Writers (1950-1980): A Critical Evaluation Black Women Writers and the Black Arts Movement "Blues Ain't No Mockin' Bird" Blues for Mister Charlie Broadside Press "Bronzeville Mother Loiters in Mississippi. Meanwhile, a Mississippi Mother Burns Bacon, A" Brooks, Gwendolyn Bullins, Ed Caldwell, Ben Caribbean Artists Movement Catherine Carmier Childress, Alice Chisholm, Shirley Coleman, Wanda Collins, Kathleen Davis, Angela Deacons for Defense and Justice Dent, Tom Dodson, Owen Du Bois, W. E. B. Dutchman Evans, Mari Evans-Charles, Martie Fire Next Time, The for colored girls who have considered suicide/when the rainbow is enuf Free-Lance Pallbearers, The Gaines, Ernest J. Giovanni, Nikki Gunn, Bill Hansberry, Lorraine Hayden, Robert Henderson, David Hopkinson, Nalo Jordan, June Kennedy, Adrienne Kgositsile, Keorapetse William Knight, Etheridge Last Poets, The "Lesson, The" Malcolm X Malcolm X, Poetry on Marginalization and the Black Arts Movement Marson, Una Milner, Ron "Monday in B-Flat" Morrison, Toni Mumbo Jumbo Music and the Black Arts Movement Neal, Larry Negro Digest / Black World / First World Negro Ensemble Company, The No Place to Be Somebody One Day When I Was Lost: A Scenario Based on Alex Haley's The Autobiography of Malcolm X Organization of Black American Culture Polite, Carlene Hatcher Ra, Sun Raisin in the Sun, A Randall, Dudley "Raymond's Run" Redmond, Eugene B. Rodgers, Carolyn Ross, Fran Sanchez, Sonia Sexual Identity and the Black Arts Movement Shange, Ntozake Shepp, Archie Slave, The Smith, Jean Wheeler Society of Umbra, The "Sonny's Blues" Soul on Ice Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee Teer, Barbara Ann This Child's Gonna Live Thomas, Lorenzo Till, Poetry on Emmett Toure, Askia Muhammad Tupac Shakur and the Black Arts Movement Understanding the New Black Poetry Voodoo Aesthetics and the Black Arts Movement Your Blues Ain't Like Mine Selected Bibliography Index About the Editors and Contributors
Verner D. Mitchell is professor of English at the University of Memphis. He is the editor of This Waiting for Love: Helene Johnson, Poet of the Harlem Renaissance (2006) and coauthor (with Cynthia Davis) of four subsequent books on women writers of the Harlem Renaissance. His work has appeared in Studies in American Culture, African American Review, American Literary History, and other journals. Cynthia Davis is professor of English at San Jacinto College in Houston, Texas, where she specializes in Caribbean and African American literatures. Her publications include Where the Wild Grape Grows: Selected Writings by Dorothy West (2004), Western Echoes of the Harlem Renaissance: The Life and Writings of Anita Scott Coleman (2008), and Literary Sisters: Dorothy West and Her Circle (2011). Mitchell and Davis are the authors of Zora Neale Hurston: An Annotated Bibliography of Works and Criticism (Scarecrow Press, 2013).