Boneheads and Brainiacs: Heroes and Scoundrels of the Nobel Prize in Medicine: Heroes and Scoundrels of the Nobel Prize in Medicine [Minkštas viršelis]

  • Formatas: Paperback / softback, 260 pages, aukštis x plotis x storis: 221x150x15 mm, weight: 363 g, Illustrations, unspecified
  • Išleidimo metai: 01-Aug-2020
  • Leidėjas: Linden Publishing Co Inc
  • ISBN-10: 1610353501
  • ISBN-13: 9781610353502
Kitos knygos pagal šią temą:
  • Formatas: Paperback / softback, 260 pages, aukštis x plotis x storis: 221x150x15 mm, weight: 363 g, Illustrations, unspecified
  • Išleidimo metai: 01-Aug-2020
  • Leidėjas: Linden Publishing Co Inc
  • ISBN-10: 1610353501
  • ISBN-13: 9781610353502
Kitos knygos pagal šią temą:
Showcasing the all-too-human personal lives that made medicine possible, this fascinating book profiles the winners of the Nobel Prize in Medicine from 1901 to 1950—a surprisingly diverse group of racists, cranks and opportunists, as well as heroes, geniuses and selfless benefactors of humanity. Original. Illustrations.

"Even the greatest minds in medicine have been terribly, terribly wrong. The inventor of the lobotomy won a Nobel prize in medicine for destroying his patients' brains. Another Nobel laureate thought malaria cured syphilis. The discoverer of anaphylacticshock also researched the spirit world and ESP. A pioneer of organ transplants was an ardent eugenicist, while the founder of sports physiology heroically spoke out against Nazism. Boneheads and Brainiacs profiles the winners of the Nobel Prize in Medicine from 1901 to 1950-a surprisingly diverse group of racists, cranks, and opportunists, as well as heroes, geniuses, and selfless benefactors of humanity. Forget all the ivory tower stereotypes of white-coated doctors finding miracle cures. Boneheads and Brainiacs reveals the messy human reality behind medical progress, in a highly entertaining book written for the ordinary reader. Some were bad scientists; others were great scientists and lousy human beings. But the majority of these researchers producedknowledge that now saves millions of lives-priceless discoveries like the role of vitamins in nutrition, the dangers of radiation, treatments for diabetes and deadly infectious diseases, and more. Boneheads and Brainiacs showcases the enthralling, all-too-human personal lives that made modern medicine possible"--

Dolan, a physician and author, profiles the winners of the Nobel Prize in Medicine from 1901 to 1950, who ranged from heroes and geniuses to racists, opportunists, and bad scientists. After an introduction to the Nobel Prize and its rules, chapters relate stories about the inventor of the lobotomy, a winner who thought malaria cured syphilis, the discoverer of anaphylactic shock who also researched the spirit world and ESP, a eugenicist who pioneered organ transplants, the founder of sports physiology who spoke out against Nazism, and other winners and their discoveries of the role of vitamins in nutrition, the dangers of radiation, treatments for diabetes and deadly infectious diseases, and other achievements. Annotation ©2020 Ringgold, Inc., Portland, OR (protoview.com)

Even the greatest minds in medicine have been terribly, terribly wrong.

The inventor of the lobotomy won a Nobel prize in medicine for destroying his patients' brains. Another Nobel laureate thought malaria cured syphilis. The discoverer of anaphylactic shock also researched the spirit world and ESP. A pioneer of organ transplants was an ardent eugenicist, while the founder of sports physiology heroically spoke out against Nazism.

Boneheads and Brainiacs profiles the winners of the Nobel Prize in Medicine from 1901 to 1950—a surprisingly diverse group of racists, cranks, and opportunists, as well as heroes, geniuses, and selfless benefactors of humanity. Forget all the ivory tower stereotypes of white-coated doctors finding miracle cures. Boneheads and Brainiacs reveals the messy human reality behind medical progress, in a highly entertaining book written for the ordinary reader.

Some were bad scientists; others were great scientists and lousy human beings. But the majority of these researchers produced knowledge that now saves millions of lives—priceless discoveries like the role of vitamins in nutrition, the dangers of radiation, treatments for diabetes and deadly infectious diseases, and more. Boneheads and Brainiacs showcases the enthralling, all-too-human personal lives that made modern medicine possible.

Preface v
Introduction ix
The Nobel Prize ix
Nobel Prize Rules xv
Chapter 1 The First Nobel Prize
1(4)
Chapter 2 The Parasite and The Pest
5(4)
Chapter 3 A Bright Future
9(6)
Chapter 4 Science Promotes a Slave State
15(6)
Chapter 5 His Eminence
21(8)
Chapter 6 The Mistaken Observer and Dr. Bacteria
29(6)
Chapter 7 The Obvious Suspects
35(2)
Chapter 8 Immunity Wars
37(6)
Chapter 9 Accidental Harm, Chocolate, and the Nobel Prize
43(6)
Chapter 10 The Perpetual Chicken
49(4)
Chapter 11 Another Eugenicist
53(4)
Chapter 12 Balance
57(6)
Chapter 13 Fighting Infection
63(6)
Chapter 14 Blood, Sweat, and Sugar
69(2)
Chapter 15 The Gentile and the Jew
71(6)
Chapter 16 The Canadian Diabetes Discoveries
77(4)
Chapter 17 Reading the Secrets of the Heart
81(4)
Chapter 18 Dead Wrong
85(4)
Chapter 19 Fever Therapy and War Crimes
89(6)
Chapter 20 Of Lice and Men
95(8)
Chapter 21 Hidden Vitality
103(8)
Chapter 22 Of the Type That Saved Millions of Lives
111(6)
Chapter 23 Greatest Influence from the Lowest Profile
117(4)
Chapter 24 The Brain Is Not the Mind
121(6)
Chapter 25 American Genesis
127(4)
Chapter 26 Eat Your Liver
131(6)
Chapter 27 Shades of Cloning
137(4)
Chapter 28 Brain Chemistry 101
141(6)
Chapter 29 Starting at the Wrong End
147(8)
Chapter 30 Matters of the Heart
155(4)
Chapter 31 Brimstone
159(6)
Chapter 32 Bleeding Chickens
165(4)
Chapter 33 Hitting a Nerve
169(4)
Chapter 34 The Rediscovery of Penicillin
173(6)
Chapter 35 Godzilla in the Making
179(8)
Chapter 36 Sugar Metabolism
187(6)
Chapter 37 The Making of a Silent Spring
193(8)
Chapter 38 Scrambled Brains
201(10)
Chapter 39 More Hormones
211(6)
Chapter 40 Nobel Influences
217(8)
Points of Interest 225(4)
References 229(16)
Index 245