Smart Cities in Application: Healthcare, Policy, and Innovation 1st ed. 2020 [Kietas viršelis]

Edited by
  • Formatas: Hardback, 171 pages, aukštis x plotis: 235x155 mm, weight: 465 g, 42 Illustrations, color; 1 Illustrations, black and white; XXII, 171 p. 43 illus., 42 illus. in color., 1 Hardback
  • Išleidimo metai: 25-Jul-2019
  • Leidėjas: Springer Nature Switzerland AG
  • ISBN-10: 3030193950
  • ISBN-13: 9783030193959
Kitos knygos pagal šią temą:
  • Formatas: Hardback, 171 pages, aukštis x plotis: 235x155 mm, weight: 465 g, 42 Illustrations, color; 1 Illustrations, black and white; XXII, 171 p. 43 illus., 42 illus. in color., 1 Hardback
  • Išleidimo metai: 25-Jul-2019
  • Leidėjas: Springer Nature Switzerland AG
  • ISBN-10: 3030193950
  • ISBN-13: 9783030193959
Kitos knygos pagal šią temą:

This book explores categories of applications and driving factors surrounding the Smart City phenomenon. The contributing authors provide perspective on the Smart Cities, covering numerous applications and classes of applications. The book uses a top-down exploration of the driving factors in Smart Cities, by including focal areas including “Smart Healthcare,” “Public Safety & Policy Issues,” and “Science, Technology, & Innovation.”  Contributors have direct and substantive experience with important aspects of Smart Cities and discuss issues with technologies & standards, roadblocks to implementation, innovations that create new opportunities, and other factors relevant to emerging Smart City infrastructures.

  • Features an exploration of Smart City issues and solutions from a variety of stakeholders in the evolving field
  • Presents conversational, nuanced, and forward thinking perspectives on Smart Cities, their implications, limitations, obstacles, and opportunities
  • Includes contributions from industry insiders who have direct, relevant experience with their respective subjects as well as positioning and corporate stature

Part I Smart Healthcare
Personalizing Healthcare in Smart Cities
3(16)
Eduardo Perez-Roman
Michelle Alvarado
Meredith Barrett
1 Introduction
3(2)
2 Overview of Personalized Healthcare Within the Context of Smart Cities
5(5)
2.1 Patient Scheduling and Resource Planning
5(2)
2.2 Healthcare Associated Infections
7(1)
2.3 Remote Technologies
8(1)
2.4 Treatments and Diagnosis
9(1)
3 Personalizing Healthcare in Smart Cities: The Propeller Health Case Study
10(4)
4 Challenges for Personalized Healthcare within the Context of Smart Cities
14(2)
4.1 Regulation
14(1)
4.2 Finances
14(1)
4.3 Developing a Culture of Health
15(1)
5 Conclusions
16(3)
References
16(3)
Creating an Equitable Smart City
19(30)
Catherine Crago Blanton
Walt Trybula
1 Introduction
20(1)
2 Uneven Terrain
21(4)
2.1 How Smart Can a City Be if Some Residents Are Not Connected?
22(1)
2.2 Why Is this Access Required?
23(2)
3 Changes in Work Structure: The Gig Economy
25(1)
4 The Responsibilities of the Smart City
25(3)
4.1 Economic Mobility and Quality of Life for Low-Income Residents
26(1)
4.2 Identifying the Responsibilities
26(1)
4.3 Who Provides the Funding?
27(1)
5 Issues with Data
28(4)
5.1 What Is Connectivity?
28(3)
5.2 Whose Data?
31(1)
6 Critical Decisions
32(7)
6.1 Smart City Decision Makers Solve for Inclusion and Equity
33(1)
6.2 Three Kinds of Decision-Making for Inclusion and Equity
33(3)
6.3 Broadband: A Lot of a Little or a Little of a Lot?
36(1)
6.4 Sensors and IoT: Can Technology Be Racist?
37(2)
7 Unlocking the Connection: The Housing Authority of the City of Austin
39(5)
8 Next Steps and Questions to Ask
44(5)
8.1 Defining "Smart" via Digital Equity and Inclusion
45(1)
8.2 Defining "Smart" via Partnerships and Coalition Building
46(1)
8.3 Defining "Smart" via Decision-making: Autonomy and Trust
46(1)
References
47(2)
Smart Responders for Smart Cities: A VR/AR Training Approach for Next Generation First Responders
49(20)
George Koutitas
Scott Smith
Grayson Lawrence
Keith Noble
1 Introduction to Training of First Responders
49(2)
2 AR/VR Technologies for Training
51(2)
3 City of Austin AmBus: Introduction
53(1)
4 A System Model for the Training of AmBus Using AR/VR
54(3)
5 Design Thinking for Training of FR
57(5)
6 Findings on Pilot Training
62(1)
6.1 Methodology
62(1)
6.2 Results
63(1)
7 Conclusions
63(6)
References
64(5)
Part II Public Safety and Policy Issues
Smart Transport
69(16)
Michael Brown
1 Introduction
69(1)
2 Applications for Smart Transport
70(7)
2.1 Emergency Electronic Brake Lights (EEBL)
70(1)
2.2 Queue Warning (Q-WARN)
71(1)
2.3 Reduced Speed Zone Warning (RSWZ)
72(1)
2.4 Cooperative Situational Awareness
72(3)
2.5 Integrated Corridor Management Systems
75(1)
2.6 Powertrain Optimization
75(2)
3 Enabling Technologies
77(5)
3.1 Navigating the Buzzwords
77(1)
3.2 The Internet of Things
77(2)
3.3 Vehicle-to-Everything
79(1)
3.4 Security
80(1)
3.5 Standards
80(2)
4 Conclusion
82(3)
References
82(3)
Smart City Automation, Securing the Future
85(16)
Adam Cason
David Wierschem
1 Introduction
86(1)
2 Opportunities
86(3)
2.1 In Vehicle
87(1)
2.2 Vehicle to Vehicle
87(1)
2.3 Vehicle to Infrastructure
88(1)
2.4 Vehicle to Services
88(1)
2.5 Vehicle to City
88(1)
3 A Definition of Trust
89(4)
3.1 In Vehicle
89(2)
3.2 Vehicle to Vehicle
91(1)
3.3 Vehicle to Infrastructure
91(1)
3.4 Vehicle to Services
92(1)
3.5 Vehicle to City
92(1)
4 Security Solutions
93(5)
4.1 Definition of Security
93(1)
4.2 Establishing the Foundation of Trust with Encryption
94(1)
4.3 Public Key Infrastructure: A High-Level Overview
95(1)
4.4 Mutual Authentication: A High-Level Overview
96(1)
4.5 Applications of PKI in the Automotive World
97(1)
4.6 Future-Proofing the Smart Transportation Infrastructure
98(1)
5 Concluding Remarks
98(3)
References
99(2)
Smart Cities Applications of Blockchain
101(20)
Joe Moorman
Michael Stricklen
1 Overview of Blockchain Technology
101(3)
1.1 Bitcoin's Meteoric Rise
102(1)
1.2 Implementation of a Blockchain
102(1)
1.3 Distributed Proof
103(1)
2 Smart Contracts
104(1)
2.1 Beyond Pure Cryptocurrencies
104(1)
2.2 Future Applications
105(1)
3 Concept for a Distributed Mobility Service Network
105(4)
3.1 Legacy Mobility Services
105(1)
3.2 Impact of Autonomous Vehicles
106(1)
3.3 Example: The "Ridecoin" Network
106(3)
4 Concept for a Distributed Microgrid
109(6)
4.1 Historical "Microgrids"
109(1)
4.2 Dominance of the Macrogrid
109(2)
4.3 Microgrid Resurgence
111(4)
5 Conclusion
115(6)
References
115(6)
Part III Science, Technology, and Innovation
The Evolving 5G Landscape
121(20)
Liam Quinn
1 Introduction: Overview of 5G
121(8)
1.1 Mission-Critical Services
124(1)
1.2 Software-Defined Infrastructure
124(1)
1.3 5G Air Interface
125(4)
2 Attributes, Use Cases, and Market Drivers
129(9)
2.1 Mobile Connectivity
132(3)
2.2 Internet of Things
135(1)
2.3 Mission-Critical Services
136(1)
2.4 AI/ML and Big Data Analytics
137(1)
3 Conclusions
138(3)
References
138(3)
Architecting IOT for Smart Cities
141(12)
Achamkulamgara Arun
1 Introduction
141(4)
1.1 City Architecture
143(1)
1.2 Enterprise IOT Architecture
143(2)
1.3 Operating Architecture
145(1)
2 Typical Considerations for Each of the Layers
145(4)
2.1 Sensing Layer
146(1)
2.2 Connectivity Layer
146(1)
2.3 Aggregation Layer
147(1)
2.4 Platform Layer
147(1)
2.5 Application Layer
148(1)
2.6 Enterprise Integration Layer
148(1)
2.7 Visualization Layer
149(1)
3 Security Considerations
149(1)
4 Interoperability
150(1)
5 Conclusions and Final Thoughts
151(2)
References
151(2)
Measuring Innovation: Tracking the Growth of Smart City Ideas
153(14)
Steve Pearson
1 Introduction
153(1)
2 Patents: An Information Treasure Trove
154(3)
3 Patent Analytics: Data Mining Patent Publications
157(2)
4 Methodologies: Zeroing in on Smart City Terms
159(2)
5 Data/Results
161(1)
6 Analysis
161(3)
7 Updates About Smart Cities Innovations Available
164(2)
8 Conclusion
166(1)
References
166(1)
Index 167
Prof. Stan McClellan is the Director of the Ingram School of Engineering at Texas State University, where he is a Professor of Electrical Engineering and researches advanced communication & networking technologies. Dr. McClellan has held notable positions in the commercial, military/aerospace, and academic industries, including Hewlett Packard, ZNYX Networks, SBE, Inc., General Dynamics, LTV Aerospace, and Rockwell International. He served as chief technologist, chief architect, or lead engineer for several distributed real-time systems, developing technologies including real-time interactive telepathology, highly available systems for telecommunications networks, real-time flight simulators using reconnaissance imagery, and a flight-worthy digital terrain system for the AFTI/F-16 testbed aircraft. He has also served as a technology & business consultant for commercial entities including BellSouth, Motorola, Cisco, 3Com, Newbridge/Alcatel, BNR/Nortel, Network Equipment Technologies (NET), MCI/Worldcom, LSU Medical Center, and others. Most recently, Dr. McClellan was a founder and Chief Technology Officer for a startup company in the Smart Grid space, where he developed a revolutionary approach to Smart Grid systems using advanced signal processing, on-wire communications, and a sophisticated system architecture incorporating endpoint mobility, autonomous device registration, and command/control capability. As the author of numerous peer-reviewed technical publications and US/international patents, Dr. McClellan is an expert in networking and distributed system optimization, particularly for voice/video transport with quality of service constraints (QoS). He has made invited contributions to well-known references including Advances in Computers, The IEEE/CRC Electrical Engineering Handbook, and The Encyclopedias of Electrical & Electronics Engineering.