Ecology and Evolution of Rhizobia: Principles and Applications 1st ed. 2019 [Kietas viršelis]

  • Formatas: Hardback, 273 pages, aukštis x plotis: 235x155 mm, weight: 712 g, 20 Tables, color; 26 Illustrations, color; 15 Illustrations, black and white; XIII, 273 p. 41 illus., 26 illus. in color., 1 Hardback
  • Išleidimo metai: 17-Jan-2020
  • Leidėjas: Springer Verlag, Singapore
  • ISBN-10: 9813295546
  • ISBN-13: 9789813295544
Kitos knygos pagal šią temą:
  • Formatas: Hardback, 273 pages, aukštis x plotis: 235x155 mm, weight: 712 g, 20 Tables, color; 26 Illustrations, color; 15 Illustrations, black and white; XIII, 273 p. 41 illus., 26 illus. in color., 1 Hardback
  • Išleidimo metai: 17-Jan-2020
  • Leidėjas: Springer Verlag, Singapore
  • ISBN-10: 9813295546
  • ISBN-13: 9789813295544
Kitos knygos pagal šią temą:

This book reviews the history and development of rhizobial ecology (diversity, function and interactions with the biotic and abiotic environments), evolution (genome diversification, systematics of symbiotic genes) and application. Further, it describes the new concept of rhizobia, the latest systematic methods, biogeographic study methods, and genomic studies to identify the interactions between rhizobia, legumes and environments. To enable readers to gain a comprehensive understanding of rhizobial biogeography, the book provides effective protocols for the selection and application of high-efficiency rhizobial inoculants. In addition, it presents standard and modern methods used in studies on rhizobial ecology and evolution in dedicated appendices, making it a unique and valuable handbook for researchers.


Preface Wen Xin Chen Unit
1. General description of rhizobia En Tao Wang
Chapter
1. Symbiosis between rhizobia and legumes Section
1. Symbiosis of rhizobia and legumes Rhizobia Rhizobia-legume symbiosis Section
2. Importance of rhizobia and rhizobial research History of rhizobial studies Ecological and economic importance of rhizobia Model of microbe-plant interaction Concluding remarks and perspectives References Unit
2. Diversity and evolution of rhizobia En Tao Wang, Chang Fu Tian, and J. Peter W. Young
Chapter
2. History of rhizobial taxonomy Section
1. Bacterial diversity and taxonomy Classification, identification and nomenclature. Section
2. History of studies on rhizobial diversity and taxonomy Cross-nodulation groups Numerical taxonomy DNA/DNA hybridization Polyphasic taxonomy
Chapter
3. Current Systematics of rhizobia Section
1. Current methodology for studying diversity and taxonomy Sampling strategies: how many strains to sample Recommended genes for studying phylogeny and genomic diversity Current criteria for identification and description of novel species Section
2. Phylogeny and systematics of rhizobia. Section
3. Alpha-rhizobia. Section
4. Beta-rhizobia.
Chapter
4. Genomics and evolution of rhizobia Section
1. The general organization of rhizobial genomes. Replicons: chromosome, chromid, and plasmid. Symbiosis plasmid and symbiosis island. Section
2. Evolution of core and accessory genes. Characteristics of core and accessory genes. Main evolutionary forces shaping the diversity of core and accessory genes. Concluding remarks and perspectives References Unit
3. Diversity and evolution of rhizobial symbiosis genes Chang Fu Tian, Wen Feng Chen, and J. Peter W. Young
Chapter
5. Symbiosis genes: diversity and organization Section
1. Pathways of diverse functions involved in symbiosis. Key symbiosis genes: nodulation and nitrogen fixation genes, nod-independent rhizobia. Symbiosis related functions: exopolysaccharides, secretion systems, and others. Section
2. The organization of symbiosis related genes. The distribution of symbiosis related genes in rhizobial genomes.
Chapter
6. Evolution of symbiosis genes: Vertical and horizontal gene transfer Section
1. Interaction between the symbiosis genes and the core genome Section
2. Horizontal transfer of symbiosis genes and their integration into the core genome
Chapter
7. Diversity of interactions between rhizobia and legumes Section
1. Rhizobia with wide host ranges. NGR 234, etc. Section
2. Rhizobia associated with symbiotically specific plants. Alfalfa, chickpea, Amorpha, etc. Section
3. Rhizobia associated with promiscuous plants. Soybean, Sophora, common bean, peanut. Section
4. Rhizobial infection through root hair or crack. Section
5. Determinate or indeterminate root nodules. Section
6. Swollen or non-swollen bacteroids. Concluding remarks and perspectives References Unit
4. Interaction of rhizobia, environments and legumes Wen Feng Chen, and Chang Fu Tian
Chapter
8. Geographical distribution of rhizobia Section
1. Biogeography of rhizobial species. Specific focus on soybean, Caragana, Astragalus, broad bean, peanut, Sophora, Phaseolus vulgaris. Section
2. Biogeography of rhizobial populations Alfalfa rhizobia, soybean rhizobia
Chapter
9. Environmental determinants of biogeography of rhizobia Section
1. Soil factors affecting the distribution of rhizobia. soybean rhizobia, and Astragalus rhizobia. Section
2. Effects of agricultural practices on distribution of rhizobia. wild vs. cultivated legumes.
Chapter
10. Effects of host plants on biogeography of rhizobia Section
1. Geographic distribution of legumes and rhizobia. Section
2. Effects of legume cultivars on rhizobial population
Chapter
11. Rhizobial genomics and biogeography Section
1. Core genes and adaptation genes of rhizobia Section
2. Genes related to the biogeography of rhizobia Concluding remarks and perspectives References Unit
5. Agricultural applications of rhizobia and other PGPR Wen Feng Chen
Chapter
12. Current status of rhizobial inoculants The using of rhizobia in USA, Brazil, Argentina, Australia, China.<
Chapter
13. Screening for effective rhizobia Section
1. Strategy to screen for effective rhizobia Consider the environments, leguminous cultivar, levels and concentration of chemical nitrogen fertilization. Section
2. Suggested rhizobia used for inoculants for legumes. Section
3. Usage of microelements to enhance nitrogen fixation Microelements, Mo, Be, Fe, fulvic acid, Nod factors.
Chapter
14. Usage of rhizobial inoculants in agriculture Section1. Inoculating methods. Section
2. Intercropping and crop rotation between legumes, and other measures to enhance nitrogen fixation. Section
3. Inoculation of soybean, peanut, alfalfa, medicinal legumes. Section
4. Combination of rhizobia with PGPR
Chapter
15. Rhizobial activity beyond nitrogen fixation Plant growth promoting, endophytic rhizobia Concluding remarks and perspectives References Unit 6 Technology and methods En Tao Wang, Chang Fu Tian, and Wen Feng Chen
Chapter
16. Working on the taxonomy, biodiversity, ecology and evolution of rhizobia Section
1. Sampling, isolation, purification, observation, preservation of them, Gram-staining, light and electron microscopy should be included. Section
2. Phenotypic characterization Application of Biolog system and determination of other features Nitrogenase activity determination Chlorophyll determination Nodulation tests and proposed cross-nodulation group Section
3. Chemical characterization Chemical taxonomy: fatty acid methyl ester profile, quinone determination Section
4. Genetics-based methods DNA fingerprinting (BOX-A1R, ERIC) MLSA (candidate genes: 16S rRNA gene, rpoB, recA, ..., nodC, nifH; evolutionary genetics statistics for mutation, recombination, and genetic differentiation), Blastn Genomics (Phylogenomics, ANI, core genes and accessory genes) Section
5. Ecological methods The relationship between rhizobial distribution and environmental factors (PCA, CA, etc.). Diversity index. High-throughput amplicon sequencing analysis (16S rRNA gene, rpoB, nodC or nodD, nifH) in soil Concluding remarks and perspectives References Index Acknowledgments
Dr. Wen Xin Chen, Dr. Wen Feng Chen and Dr. Chang Fu Tian currently work at the College of Biological Sciences and Rhizobium Research Center, China Agricultural University. Dr. Wen Xin Chen was elected into the Chinese Academy of Sciences in 2001. Dr. Wen Xin Chen and Dr. Chang Fu Tian are members of the ICSP Subcommittee on the Taxonomy of Rhizobia and Agrobacteria. Dr. En Tao Wang works at the Departamento de Microbiologia, Escuela Nacional de Ciencias Biologicas, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Mexico. Dr. J Peter W Young is an Emeritus Professor of Molecular Ecology at the University of York. He is the Chairman of the ICSP Subcommittee on the Taxonomy of Rhizobia and Agrobacteria.