Introduction to Sustainable Transportation: Policy, Planning and Implementation 2nd New edition [Minkštas viršelis]

  • Formatas: Paperback / softback, 420 pages, aukštis x plotis: 248x191 mm, weight: 1202 g, 4 Line drawings, color; 188 Halftones, color; 36 Tables, black and white
  • Išleidimo metai: 09-Nov-2017
  • Leidėjas: Routledge
  • ISBN-10: 1138185485
  • ISBN-13: 9781138185487
Kitos knygos pagal šią temą:
  • Formatas: Paperback / softback, 420 pages, aukštis x plotis: 248x191 mm, weight: 1202 g, 4 Line drawings, color; 188 Halftones, color; 36 Tables, black and white
  • Išleidimo metai: 09-Nov-2017
  • Leidėjas: Routledge
  • ISBN-10: 1138185485
  • ISBN-13: 9781138185487
Kitos knygos pagal šią temą:
Cities around the globe struggle to create better and more equitable access to important destinations and services, all the while reducing the energy consumption and environmental impacts of mobility. An Introduction to Sustainable Transportation illustrates a new planning paradigm for sustainable transportation through case studies from around the world with hundreds of valuable resources and references, color photos, graphics and tables. The second edition builds and expands upon the highly acclaimed first edition, with new chapters on urban design and urban, regional and intercity public transportation, as well as expanded chapters on automobile dependence and equity issues; automobile cities and the car culture; the history of sustainable and unsustainable transportation; the interrelatedness of technologies, infrastructure energy and functionalities; and public policy and public participation and exemplary places, people and programs around the globe. Among the many valuable additions are discussions of autonomous vehicles (AVs), electric vehicles (EVs), airport cities, urban fabrics, urban heat island effects and mobility as a service (MaaS). New case studies show global exemplars of sustainable transportation, including several from Asia, a case study of participative and deliberative public involvement, as well as one describing life in the Vauban ecologically planned community of Freiburg, Germany. Students in affiliated sustainability disciplines, planners, policymakers and concerned citizens will find many provides practical techniques to innovate and transform transportation.
Lists of figures, tables and boxes
ix
Acknowledgements xvi
Acronyms and abbreviations xvii
Foreword xx
Introduction and overview 1(10)
1 A highly mobile planet and its challenges: automobile dependence, equity and inequity
11(28)
Sustainable transportation, accessible transportation or sustainable mobility?
11(1)
What is sustainable transportation about?
11(1)
Unsustainable transportation: the magnitude of the problem
12(1)
Hypermobility
13(1)
The problems of automobile dependence
14(17)
Equity, social justice and auto-dependence
31(5)
Summary
36(1)
Conclusions
37(2)
2 Automobile cities, the car culture and alternative possibilities
39(35)
Introduction
39(1)
Walking cities, transit cities and automobile cities
39(3)
Additional lessons from city types
42(4)
Car culture
46(7)
Sociology of transportation and the car culture
53(1)
Automobility and safety: ideology versus analysis
53(2)
The mainstream media and the car culture: myth overshadows reality
55(1)
Marketing the myth: screens, earbuds, branding, embedding and product placement
56(4)
Movies and TV: the automobile as star and sponsor
60(1)
Radio and cars
61(2)
Music and the car culture
63(1)
Car culture in literature
64(2)
`Carchitecture': reshaping architecture and urban design for automobile cities
66(1)
`Futurama': we have seen the future and it drives!
67(1)
Tourism: the car culture evolves into the fly-drive and recreational vehicle cultures
68(4)
Conclusions
72(2)
3 History of sustainable and unsustainable transportation: from walking to wheels and back to walking
74(33)
Transportation history: the intersection of modes, infrastructure and society
74(4)
Walking: the original affordable, healthful and sustainable mode
78(2)
Wheels, early vehicles and travel: mostly local and for necessity
80(1)
Pilgrimages around the planet
80(3)
Mechanization and motorization transform travel and society
83(2)
Bicycling: the sustainable path almost taken
85(5)
Transportation infrastructure: from animal paths to `Good Roads'
90(2)
The rise of automobility
92(6)
Maritime and water travel
98(1)
Aviation: from the feat of flying to fly-drive excess
99(1)
Telecommunications and transportation: from smoke signals to mobile telephones
99(2)
Rail and railways
101(2)
Conclusion: lessons for sustainable transportation
103(4)
4 Modes, roads and routes: technologies, infrastructure, functions, energy and inter-relatedness
107(51)
Introduction
107(1)
In-town modes: getting to work, school, shopping, services and recreation
108(13)
Regional-metropolitan area modes: long commutes, regional services, recreation, peak demand
121(3)
The barrier effects of different rights of way
124(1)
Long distance: modes and types of travel
124(10)
Sustainability considerations: fuels, pollution, electric and autonomous vehicles
134(6)
Modal energy consumption and occupancy factors in global cities
140(8)
Topographically appropriate modes: aerial and suspended trams, monorails, funiculars
148(3)
Futuristic, experimental or unproven modes
151(2)
Back to the Futuristic: e-bikes, pedicabs, cargo and beer bikes
153(2)
Conclusions
155(3)
5 Urban, regional and intercity public transportation: policy, technical, land use and provider aspects
158(36)
Introduction
158(1)
The relationship between public transportation and land use and transportation planning
159(1)
Urban transport systems and their influence on urban form
160(1)
Transit as a natural monopoly
161(1)
Practical problems besetting public transportation
162(1)
The fast-changing mobility and accessibility landscape
163(2)
Urban public transportation: urban form and modal integration issues
165(2)
Polycentrism and urban mobility
167(3)
Bus-rail integration and bus-bus integration
170(1)
Growing transit: policy and planning issues
170(6)
Promoting transit at all levels of government
176(1)
Overcoming stagnant and unimaginative planning
176(1)
Addressing the needs of special populations
176(1)
Adequate and stable funding
177(1)
Synergies between transit and land use
178(1)
Participatory planning
178(1)
Regional and rural public transportation
178(2)
When urban meets regional and rural
180(1)
Intercity public transportation: trains and coaches
180(2)
Aviation, airports and airport cities
182(2)
Private and corporate providers and public transportation
184(4)
Special planning and policy issues around the public-private interface
188(3)
Park & Ride: useful or harmful?
191(1)
Conclusion
192(2)
6 Urban design for sustainable and active transportation and healthy communities
194(33)
Introduction
194(1)
Urban planning and urban design: getting our bearings
194(2)
Urban design and sustainable transportation
196(8)
Urban fabrics theory
204(5)
Sustainable urban design
209(15)
Conclusion
224(3)
7 Public policy and effective citizen participation for more sustainable transportation: methods and examples
227(22)
The public, policy and participation
227(1)
Transportation policy: from mobility promotion to mobility management and sustainability
228(1)
Transportation policy in the twentieth century: a global perspective
229(7)
The public and participation: from Arnstein to Aarhus and the Rio Declaration
236(2)
Public participation in transportation: ways to get everyone involved---including trees
238(5)
From business as usual (BAU) to sustainability in transportation
243(6)
8 A new planning paradigm: from integrated planning, policy and mobility management to repair, regeneration and renewal
249(41)
Lessons learned from preceding chapters
249(1)
The recognition of the need for a new paradigm: the Buchanan Report and its critics
250(2)
Overview of the new paradigm: integrated policy-making, planning and mobility management
252(1)
Towards better management of existing transportation features
252(10)
Description of the new paradigm of integrated planning
262(5)
New paradigm factors summary
267(2)
Moving from planning and policy to regeneration, repair and renewal
269(17)
Sustainable transportation agenda and priorities
286(2)
From the new paradigm to its embodiment
288(2)
9 Cities on the move: global exemplars of more sustainable transportation
290(48)
Introduction
290(1)
Vancouver, British Columbia: automobile city to a planner's pilgrimage
291(8)
Portland, Oregon: from `a streetcar named expire' to an aspiring `streetcar city'
299(5)
Boulder, Colorado: small is beautiful and effective
304(5)
Freiburg im Breisgau, Germany: a pin-up sustainable city
309(7)
Seoul, South Korea: rivers of cars to rivers of water and people
316(4)
Taming the traffic in non-motorized cities: positive perspectives on Mumbai, Beijing, Shanghai and Guangzhou
320(14)
Conclusions
334(4)
10 Conclusion: growing more exemplars
338(34)
Necessities for growing more exemplars
338(6)
Heroes and heroicism in sustainable transportation
344(1)
Leadership and responsiveness within government
344(3)
Academic and professional expertise, the `long haul' and subverting the dominant paradigm
347(1)
Environmental and other non-governmental organizations (NGOs)
348(8)
Private-sector leadership
356(2)
The creative class: breathing imagination into urban and transportation planning
358(4)
Success builds success: the power of demonstration projects
362(6)
Conclusion
368(4)
Glossary 372(3)
References 375(36)
Index 411
Preston L. Schiller brought a background in sociology and anthropology and work in medical education and public health to issues of air pollution and transportation in the late 1980s, as well as being the author of many research reports and journal articles. He has worked on these at national, state and local levels with several NGOs, including the Sierra Club, as well as serving on numerous government advisory task forces and committees. His career in sustainable transportation began by walking at age one, cycling at age five, and navigating transit solo around Chicago at age 11. Jeffrey R. Kenworthy is a Professor in Sustainable Cities at Curtin University in Perth, Western Australia, additionally holding guest positions at the Frankfurt University of Applied Sciences in Germany and the K2 Swedish Knowledge Centre for Public Transport in Lund. He has almost 40 years of experience in the transport and urban planning field, specializing in international comparisons of cities, and has published extensively on a wide range of urban topics.