Oxford Handbook of Evidentiality [Kietas viršelis]

Edited by (Distinguished Professor, Australian Laureate Fellow, and Director of the Language and Culture Research Centre, James Cook University)
  • Formatas: Hardback, 928 pages, aukštis x plotis x storis: 252x178x55 mm, weight: 1762 g
  • Serija: Oxford Handbooks
  • Išleidimo metai: 08-Feb-2018
  • Leidėjas: Oxford University Press
  • ISBN-10: 0198759517
  • ISBN-13: 9780198759515
Kitos knygos pagal šią temą:
  • Formatas: Hardback, 928 pages, aukštis x plotis x storis: 252x178x55 mm, weight: 1762 g
  • Serija: Oxford Handbooks
  • Išleidimo metai: 08-Feb-2018
  • Leidėjas: Oxford University Press
  • ISBN-10: 0198759517
  • ISBN-13: 9780198759515
Kitos knygos pagal šią temą:
This volume offers a thorough, systematic, and crosslinguistic account of evidentiality, the linguistic encoding of the source of information on which a statement is based. In some languages, the speaker always has to specify this source - for example whether they saw the event, heard it, inferred it based on visual evidence or common sense, or was told about it by someone else. While not all languages have obligatory marking of this type, every language has ways of referring to information source and associated epistemological meanings. The continuum of epistemological expressions covers a range of devices from the lexical means in familiar European languages and in many languages of Aboriginal Australia to the highly grammaticalized systems in Amazonia or North America. In this handbook, experts from a variety of fields explore topics such as the relationship between evidentials and epistemic modality, contact-induced changes in evidential systems, the acquisition of evidentials, and formal semantic theories of evidentiality. The book also contains detailed case studies of evidentiality in language families across the world, including Algonquian, Korean, Nakh-Dagestanian, Nambikwara, Turkic, Uralic, and Uto-Aztecan.
Preface ix
List of maps
xi
List of tables
xiii
List of figures
xvii
Abbreviations and conventions xix
The contributors xxv
1 Evidentiality: The framework
1(39)
Alexandra Y. Aikhenvald
Appendix A Fieldworker guide to evidentiality systems: Checklist of points
37(3)
Appendix B Evidentiality and related concepts: Glossary of terms
40(1)
PART I EVIDENTIALITY: ITS EXPRESSION, SCOPE, AND HISTORY
40(135)
2 Evidentials and person
47(18)
Jackson T.-S. Sun
3 Evidentiality and its relations with other verbal categories
65(20)
Diana Forker
4 Evidentials and epistemic modality
85(24)
Bjorn Wiemer
5 Non-propositional evidentiality
109(15)
Guillaume Jacques
6 Where do evidentials come from?
124(24)
Victor A. Friedman
7 Evidentiality and language contact
148(27)
Alexandra Y. Aikhenvald
PART II EVIDENTIALITY IN COGNITION, COMMUNICATION, AND SOCIETY
8 Evidentials, information sources, and cognition
175(10)
Ercenur Unal
Anna Papafragou
9 The acquisition of evidentiality
185(17)
Stanka A. Fitneva
10 The interactional and cultural pragmatics of evidentiality in Pastaza Quichua
202(20)
Janis B. Nuckolls
11 Evidence and evidentiality in Quechua narrative discourse
222(21)
Rosaleen Howard
12 Stereotypes and evidentiality
243(18)
Michael Wood
PART III EVIDENTIALITY AND INFORMATION SOURCES: FURTHER ISSUES AND APPROACHES
13 Evidentiality: The notion and the term
261(12)
Kasper Boye
14 Extragrammatical expression of information source
273(13)
Mario Squartini
15 Evidentiality and formal semantic theories
286(29)
Margaret Speas
PART IV EVIDENTIALITY ACROSS THE WORLD
16 Evidentiality and the Cariban languages
315(18)
Eithne B. Carlin
17 Evidentiality in Nambikwara languages
333(24)
David M. Eberhard
18 Evidentiality in Tukanoan languages
357(31)
Kristine Stenzel
Elsa Gomez-Imbert
19 Evidentiality in Boran and Witotoan languages
388(21)
Katarzyna I. Wojtylak
20 Evidentiality in the Uto-Aztecan languages
409(22)
Tim Thornes
21 Evidentiality in Algonquian
431(32)
Marie-Odile Junker
Conor M. Quinn
J. Randolph Valentine
22 Evidentiality and epistemic modality in Gitksan
463(27)
Tyler Peterson
23 Evidentiality in Nakh-Daghestanian languages
490(20)
Diana Forker
24 Turkic indirectivity
510(15)
Lars Johanson
25 Evidentials in Uralic languages
525(29)
Elena Skribnik
Petar Kehayov
26 Evidentiality in Mongolic
554(26)
Benjamin Brosig
Elena Skribnik
27 Evidentiality in Tibetic
580(15)
Scott DeLancey
28 Evidentiality in Bodic languages
595(15)
Gwendolyn Hyslop
29 Evidentiality and the expression of knowledge: An African perspective
610(19)
Anne Storch
30 Evidentiality in the languages of New Guinea
629(28)
Hannah Sarvasy
31 Evidentiality in Formosan languages
657(17)
Chia-Jung Pan
32 The reportative in the languages of the Philippines
674(19)
Josephine S. Daguman
33 Evidentiality in Korean
693(16)
Ho-Min Sohn
34 Evidentiality in Japanese
709(16)
Heiko Narrog
Wenjiang Yang
35 Dizque and other emergent evidential forms in Romance languages
725(16)
Asier Alcazar
36 Evidentiality and information source in signed languages
741(14)
Sherman Wilcox
Barbara Shaffer
References 755(88)
Author Index 843(16)
Language Index 859(14)
Subject Index 873
Alexandra Y. Aikhenvald is Distinguished Professor, Australian Laureate Fellow, and Director of the Language and Culture Research Centre at James Cook University. She is a major authority on languages of the Arawak family, from northern Amazonia, and has written grammars of Bare (1995) and Warekena (1998), plus A Grammar of Tariana, from Northwest Amazonia (CUP, 2003) and The Manambu language of East Sepik, Papua New Guinea (OUP, 2008; paperback 2010), in addition to essays on various typological and areal features of South American and Papuan languages and typological issues including evidentials, classifiers, and serial verbs. Her other recent publications with OUP include Imperatives and Commands (2010), Languages of the Amazon (2012; paperback 2015), The Art of Grammar (2014), and How Gender Shapes the World (2016).