Pharmaceutical Microbiological Quality Assurance and Control: Practical Guide for Non-Sterile Manufacturing [Kietas viršelis]

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  • Formatas: Hardback, 592 pages, aukštis x plotis x storis: 231x160x33 mm, weight: 1043 g
  • Išleidimo metai: 20-Nov-2019
  • Leidėjas: Wiley-Blackwell
  • ISBN-10: 1119356075
  • ISBN-13: 9781119356073
Kitos knygos pagal šią temą:
  • Formatas: Hardback, 592 pages, aukštis x plotis x storis: 231x160x33 mm, weight: 1043 g
  • Išleidimo metai: 20-Nov-2019
  • Leidėjas: Wiley-Blackwell
  • ISBN-10: 1119356075
  • ISBN-13: 9781119356073
Kitos knygos pagal šią temą:
Relying on practical examples from the authors' experience, this book provides a thorough and modern approach to controlling and monitoring microbial contaminations during the manufacturing of non-sterile pharmaceuticals. Offers a comprehensive guidance for non-sterile pharmaceuticals microbiological QA/QC Presents the latest developments in both regulatory expectations and technical advancements Provides guidance on statistical tools for risk assessment and trending of microbiological data Describes strategy and practical examples from the authors' experience in globalized pharmaceutical companies and expert networks Offers a comprehensive guidance for non-sterile pharmaceuticals microbiological QA/QC Presents the latest developments in both regulatory expectations and technical advancements Provides guidance on statistical tools for risk assessment and trending of microbiological data Describes strategy and practical examples from the authors' experience in globalized pharmaceutical companies and expert networks
Editors xix List of Contributors xxi Preface xxvii Foreword xxxiii Acknowledgments xxxv 1 Microbiological Control Strategy 1 David Roesti and Marcel Goverde 1.1 Introduction 1 1.2 Overview of a Microbial Control Strategy Program 2 1.3 Main Factors to Be Controlled 4 1.4 Conclusion 18 Bibliography 18 2 Microbial Contamination Risk Assessment in Non?sterile Drug Product Manufacturing and Risk Mitigation 23 Tony Cundell 2.1 Introduction 24 2.2 Regulatory, Compendia, and Industry Guidance 24 2.3 Putting into Perspective the Microbiological Risk Associated with Non?sterile Products 25 2.4 Risk Assessment Tools 29 2.5 Organizational Risk Management Maturity 35 2.6 Hierarchy of Risks 35 2.7 Effect of Product Attributes 46 2.8 Emerging Manufacturing Technologies 48 2.9 A Case History 52 2.10 Conclusions 53 Bibliography 53 3 Qualification of Microbiological Laboratory Personnel and Equipment 57 Robert Schwarz 3.1 Introduction 57 3.2 Reasons, Requirements, and Strategies for Qualification 58 3.3 Critical Aspects of Microbiological Methods 68 3.4 Practical Examples for Qualification of Laboratory Personnel 72 Acknowledgments 76 Bibliography 76 4 Introduction to Culture Media in Pharmaceutical Microbiology for Non?sterile Products 79 Marion Louis, Laurent Leblanc, and Felix A. Montero Julian 4.1 Introduction 80 4.2 Culture Media Challenges and Development 83 4.3 Importance of Culture Media for Patient Safety 83 4.4 Culture Media are all Different 83 4.5 Innovation in Regard to Culture Media 91 4.6 Quality Controls 92 4.7 Culture Media Troubleshooting 98 4.8 Conclusion 103 Bibliography 103 5 Microbiological Examination of Non?sterile Final Dosage Forms and Raw Material Including Acceptance Criteria and Testing Frequency 105 David Roesti 5.1 Microbiological Acceptance Criteria 106 5.2 Testing Frequency 112 5.3 Procedure if Microbial Growth Occurs in Routine Testing 117 5.4 Sampling 117 5.5 Nutrient Medium Controls 120 5.6 Test Method Overview 125 5.7 Verification of the Suitability of the Method 127 5.8 Microbiological Examination of Non?sterile Products 142 5.9 Elements to Consider for Raw Data Sheets 148 Acknowledgments 149 Bibliography 149 6 Microbial Requirements and Testing of Primary Packaging 153 Marcel Goverde 6.1 Introduction 154 6.2 Guidelines and Literature 161 6.3 Acceptance Criteria and Testing Frequency 164 6.4 Test Methods 170 6.5 Suitability Test 174 6.6 OOS Procedure 177 6.7 Examples of OOS or OOE Cases 178 6.8 Conclusion 184 Bibliography 185 7 Utilities Design and Testing 189 Tim Sandle 7.1 Introduction 190 7.2 Defining, Developing, and Maintaining Utilities 191 7.3 Review of Critical Utilities 198 7.4 Conclusion 226 Bibliography 227 8 Microbiological Environmental Monitoring 231 Alexandra Stark 8.1 Introduction 232 8.2 Microbiological Control Strategy 233 8.3 Cleanliness Zoning Concept for Non?sterile Products 233 8.4 Microbiological Environmental Monitoring Strategy 234 8.5 Microbiological Environmental Monitoring Methods 235 8.6 Method Validations and Suitability Tests for Microbiological Environmental Monitoring 238 8.7 Initial Validation of Cleanrooms and Production Equipment 244 8.8 Definition of a Microbiological Environmental Routine Monitoring Program 246 8.9 Microbiological Environmental Monitoring: Examples for Users 253 8.10 Conclusion 261 Bibliography 262 9 Identification of Microorganisms 265 Christine E. Farrance 9.1 Introduction 266 9.2 History and Challenges of Bacterial Taxonomy and Classification 268 9.3 History and Challenges of Fungal Taxonomy and Classification 276 9.4 Current Identification Technologies 279 9.5 Strengths and Weaknesses with Each Categorical Method 306 9.6 Case Studies from a Contract Testing Lab 309 9.7 Conclusion 313 Bibliography 314 10 Calculating Alert Levels and Trending of Microbiological Data 329 David Roesti 10.1 Introduction 330 10.2 Goal of the
Chapter 332 10.3 Alert Levels Based on Historical Data 332 10.4 Trending 355 10.5 Conclusion 367 Acknowledgments 367 Bibliography 367 11 Exclusion of Objectionable Microorganisms from Non?sterile Pharmaceutical Drug Products 371 Tony Cundell 11.1 Introduction 372 11.2 What is an Objectionable Microorganism? 374 11.3 Screening for Objectionable Microorganisms 383 11.4 Risk?Based Microbial Testing of Non?sterile Drug Products 388 11.5 Sources of Objectionable Microorganisms 389 11.6 Risk Assessment to Determine if a Microorganism is Objectionable in a Non?sterile Drug Product 392 11.7 Case Histories 395 11.8 Conclusions 398 Bibliography 399 12 Data Integrity and Microbiological Excursion Handling 401 David Roesti and Marcel Goverde 12.1 Data Integrity 401 12.2 General Concept for Microbiological Excursion 410 12.3 Considerations for Excursions 420 Bibliography 427 13 Rapid Microbiological Methods 429 Michael J. Miller 13.1 Introduction 429 13.2 The Current State of Microbiology Testing 431 13.3 Rapid Microbiological Methods 432 13.4 Applications for Non?sterile Pharmaceutical Drug Products 433 13.5 Technology Review 435 13.6 Validating Rapid Microbiological Methods 447 13.7 Developing a Business Case for Rapid Methods 454 13.8 Summary 455 Bibliography 456 14 Validation of a Rapid Microbiological Method for the Microbiological Examination of Non?sterile and Nonfilterable Drug Products, APIs, and Excipients 459 Oliver Gordon and David Roesti 14.1 Introduction 460 14.2 Method Validation 462 14.3 Suitability Test (Product?Specific Method Validation) 479 14.4 Discussion 483 14.5 Conclusion 486 Acknowledgments 486 Bibliography 487 15 An Ex?Regulator's View of the Microbiology QA/QC Functions in the US Pharmaceutical Industries 489 David Hussong 15.1 Foods, Drugs, and Quality 489 15.2 Why Microbes Confound a Census 492 15.3 Microbiological QA Decisions 494 15.4 Who Has Responsibility for Quality? 495 15.5 Product and Process Planning 496 15.6 Quality and Documentation in Drug Manufacturing 499 15.7 Summary 500 Bibliography 501 16 Practical Guide for Microbiological QA/QC of Non?sterile Pharmaceuticals Manufacturing for EU 505 Ina Bach 16.1 Introduction 505 16.2 General Requirements 506 16.3 Audit Assessment Tools of a Microbiological Laboratory 508 16.4 Regulatory Audits in the Microbiology Department 514 16.5 Conclusions 516 Bibliography 517 17 Which Microbiological Tests Can Better Be Performed In?house and What Can Be Easily Outsourced 519 Thomas Meindl and Ingo Grimm 17.1 Introduction 519 17.2 Advantages and Disadvantages of Outsourcing 522 17.3 Business Case and Hidden Costs 524 17.4 Hidden Costs 528 17.5 Quality Agreement Between the Contract Laboratory and the Requesting Company 529 17.6 Auditing Contract Laboratories 532 17.7 A Case History 532 17.8 Conclusions 535 Bibliography 536 Index 539
David Roesti, PhD, works at Novartis Pharma AG in Stein, Switzerland, and is responsible for defining the microbial control strategy at the site and is a global subject matter expert in microbiology for the Novartis group. He is also is an elected member of the General Chapters Microbiology Expert Committee of the Unites States Pharmacopoeia 2015-2020 revision cycle. Marcel Goverde, PhD, runs MGP Consulting GmbH for consulting, training and project management in GMP-relevant areas with a focus on microbiology, hygiene and deviation management. He is the Swiss expert in the EDQM group for Modern Microbiological Methods since 2003, which was then integrated into Group 1 (Microbiological Methods and Statistical Analysis) in 2015.