Race, Gender, and the History of Early Analytic Philosophy [Kietas viršelis]

  • Formatas: Hardback, 270 pages, aukštis x plotis x storis: 229x152x19 mm, weight: 568 g, 3 Tables, unspecified; 2 Illustrations, black and white
  • Išleidimo metai: 01-Aug-2020
  • Leidėjas: Lexington Books
  • ISBN-10: 1498595553
  • ISBN-13: 9781498595551
Kitos knygos pagal šią temą:
  • Formatas: Hardback, 270 pages, aukštis x plotis x storis: 229x152x19 mm, weight: 568 g, 3 Tables, unspecified; 2 Illustrations, black and white
  • Išleidimo metai: 01-Aug-2020
  • Leidėjas: Lexington Books
  • ISBN-10: 1498595553
  • ISBN-13: 9781498595551
Kitos knygos pagal šią temą:
Although what we now call "analytic philosophy" has been around at least since the turn of the twentieth century, it wasn't until the latter half of the twentieth century that it became the dominant mode of philosophizing in the Western world. In Race, Gender, and the History of Early Analytic Philosophy, Matt LaVine argues that the changes associated with this shift from early analytic philosophy, a revolutionary movement, to later analytic philosophy, the hegemon, have not been sufficiently recognized. While a significant portion of the analytic philosophy of the late 1900s was apolitical and conservative, LaVine argues that there is much to gain by thinking of early analytic philosophy in relation to liberatory and emancipatory political aims. In particular, there is great potential in bringing together inquiry into critical theories of race and gender with inquiry into analytic philosophy. LaVine supports this idea by discussing the philosophy of language and logic in relation to the Black Lives Matter movement, the objectification of women, and more. Furthermore, LaVine argues there is more precedent for this type of work in the history of early analytic philosophy-in particular, in the work of G.E. Moore, Susan Stebbing, Rudolf Carnap, and Ruth Barcan Marcus-than is traditionally recognized.

Recenzijos

"Analytic philosophy at large has the connotation, whether deservedly or not, of undertheorizing issues affecting marginalized communities, but Dr. LaVine turns that on its head. He connects analytic philosophy to issues of social importance, particularly gender and race, by applying discursive injustice and analytic history to case studies addressing marginalized issues; thus, driving analytic philosophy towards considerations of justice. In doing so, he intertwines philosophy of language, logic, human interaction, and lived experiences to propel philosophers, especially analytic philosophers, into action for 'real-world movements.' Dr. LaVine's work truly encouraged me, and I would challenge everyone interested in Analytic philosophy to pick it up and start reading."--Dwight Lewis, University of Central Florida "LaVine's book brings analytic tools to issues in social justice and illuminates just how useful analytic philosophy can be. This is an essential contribution to the field of analytic philosophy and should be read by everyone in it."--Teresa K. Kissel, Old Dominion University "Matt LaVine's Race, Gender, and the History of Early Analytic Philosophy is a timely and long overdue scholarly work which puts a serious dent in the fight against the persisting bias that analytic philosophy is ahistorical and apolitical. Matt LaVine's carefully woven tapestry is truly intersectional in nature in that it combines history of philosophy with logic, epistemology, especially social epistemology, critical theory, self-reflection, and remarkable awareness of current academic tendencies. I am hopeful that Matt Lavine's book will inspire a change in the philosophical canon in that it offers an alternative story of the evolvement and goals of analytic philosophy toward inclusivity and diversity on all levels of discourse and practice."--Iva Apostolova, Dominican University College

Acknowledgments ix
Preface xi
Part 1 xvii
Introduction xix
Part 2 Race, Gender, And Analytic Philosophy (The Method)
xxxvii
1 Discursive Injustice and the History of Analytic Philosophy: The Marcus/Kripke Case
1(28)
2 The History (and Future) of Logic (and Ethics)
29(30)
PART 3 RACE, GENDER, AND ANALYTIC PHILOSOPHY (THE MOVEMENT)
59(132)
3 Starting Points in Philosophy and Starting Points in the Analytic Tradition
61(24)
4 Post-Tractarian Critique of Metaphysics and Ethics
85(24)
5 Logical Empiricism and the Scientific Worldview
109(32)
6 Black Lives Matter and the Logic of Conversation
141(22)
7 Quinean Naturalized, Socialized Epistemology for Critical Theory
163(28)
PART 4
191(2)
Conclusion 193(14)
Bibliography 207(16)
Index 223(8)
About the Author 231
Matt LaVine is assistant professor of interdisciplinary studies, coordinator of the exploratory program, and program analyst in the division of diversity, equity, and inclusion at SUNY Potsdam.